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SU’s Ray Smith symposia explore impact of dissent, displacement

Series kicks off with community panel discussion, concert Sept. 14

Aug 28, 2012 | Article by: Rob Enslin

Detail from Juan Cruz painting "The Kingdom of This World"

Detail from "The Kingdom of This World," by Juan Cruz, who is participating in "Moving Borders"


Displacement and dissent are the foci of two yearlong Ray Smith symposia at Syracuse University.

Moving Borders: The Culture and Politics of Displacement in and from Latin America and the Caribbean” is organized and presented by faculty members of the Program on Latin America and the Caribbean (PLACA) in the Moynihan Institute for Global Affairs in the Maxwell School.

Concurrently, “Positions of Dissent” is organized and presented by the Special Collections Research Center (SCRC) at SU Library, as well as an interdisciplinary group of faculty from across campus.  

The symposia are enabled by a major bequest from the estate of Ray W. Smith ’21, administered by The College of Arts and Sciences. All events are free and open to the public.

“The College is proud to sponsor two Ray Smith symposia this year, affirming our commitment to sustained scholarly discussion about important issues,” says Gerald R. Greenberg, senior associate dean for academic affairs and the humanities; associate dean of curriculum, instruction, and programming; and associate professor of languages, literatures, and linguistics. “’Moving Borders’ will look at the impact of cultural, political, and economic displacement. ‘Positions of Dissent’ will reflect on the theme of dissent and its relevance to the humanities, while drawing on the rich primary source collections of the Special Collections Research Center. Both symposia have considerable crossover appeal.”  

The symposia will come together for a special kick-off event titled “Feeling on the Outside” on Friday, Sept. 14, at 7 p.m. in Hendricks Chapel. Free and open to the public, the event will feature a community panel discussion with Sean Quimby, librarian and senior director of the SCRC; Luis Castañeda, associate professor of art and music histories in The College of Arts and Sciences; Juan Cruz, artist-in-residence in the Near West Side of Syracuse; and others. The discussion is followed by a musical performance by Trio Los Claveles and then by a mini-exhibition and reception.

For more information about “Feeling on the Outside,” call Elane Granger Carrasco, associate director of the Slutzker Center for International Services and co-organizer of “Moving Borders,” at 315-443- 2457.



MOVING BORDERS

“Moving Borders” is divided into four thematic clusters: “Borders,” “Homeland,” “Citizenship,” and “Movement.” Each cluster spans several days, and features two keynote lectures, a mini-seminar, and other events and activities.  Everything is free and open to the public, but pre-registration is required for the mini-seminars.

Sydney Hutchinson, assistant professor of art and music histories, is co-organizing the symposium with Elane Granger and a team of nine other faculty members. “Changes in global conditions, brought on by political, military, cultural, and economic crises, have caused mass movements of people,” says Hutchinson. “These movements, in turn, have sparked intense debates over identity, politics, economic policy, and immigration. ’Moving Borders’ will examine issues of borders and displacement through various disciplinary perspectives and forms of representation, including film, music, dance, and literature.”

Adds Granger: “We seek to understand how cultural, political, and economic displacement affects individuals and nations, particularly in Latin America and the Caribbean. With displacement comes emerging notions of borders, homeland, citizenship, and movement that need to be explored, questioned, and redefined.”

The “Moving Borders” schedule is as follows:

Borders

Screening: “Sin Nombre” (2009)
Thursday, Sept. 20, at 6 p.m.
Newhouse 3 (141)

Keynote Lecture I: “Political Equators: Migrant Urbanizations of Retrofit”
Teddy Cruz, professor of visual arts at the University of California, San Diego
Keynote Lecture II: “Border Re-Creations: Art, Culture, and Identity at the U.S./Mexican Border”
José Manuel Valenzuela Arce, professor of cultural studies at the College of the Northern Border (Mexico)
Thursday, Sept. 27, at 6 p.m.
Maxwell Auditorium

Concert: “The Bolero Across Borders,” featuring Trio Los Claveles
Thursday, Sept. 27, at 8:30 p.m.
La Casita Cultural Center (109 Otisco St., Syracuse)
RSVP with elcarras@syr.edu

Mini-Seminar: Teddy Cruz and José Manuel Valenzuela Arce
Friday, Sept. 28, at 10 a.m.
Bowne Hall (308)
RSVP at elcarras@syr.edu

Screening:  “Postcards from Leningrad” (2007)
Thursday, Oct. 11, at 6 p.m.
Eggers Hall (220)


Homeland

Screening: “Diario de uma busca” (2010)
Thursday, Oct. 25, at 6 p.m.
Newhouse 3 (141)

Keynote Lecture I: “Culture Works: On the Trials of Building a National Latino/a Museum”
Arlene Dávila, professor of anthropology and of social and cultural analysis at New York University
Thursday, Nov. 8, at 6 p.m.
Maxwell Auditorium

Keynote Lecture II: “Exiles Within Exiles: Herbert Daniel, Gay Brazilian Revolutionary”
James Green, professor of history and Brazilian Studies at Brown University
Friday, Nov. 9, at 10 a.m.
Eggers Hall (220)

Mini-Seminar: Arlene Dávila and James Green
Friday, Nov. 9, at 2:30 p.m.
Maxwell Hall (204)
RSVP at mygarcia@syr.edu

Exhibition Opening and Reception: “Angels on the Border”
Friday, Nov. 9, at 7:30 p.m.
La Casita Cultural Center


Citizenship

Keynote Lecture I: “Can Immigrants and Native People Be Citizens? Critical Race Theory, the Law, and the State”
Gerald Torres, the Bryant Smith Chair of Law at The University of Texas at Austin
Keynote Lecture II: “Moveable Citizenship? Latino/a Dialects of ‘Citizenship’ and ‘Belonging’”
Suzanne Oboler, professor of Latin American and Latina/o Studies at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York
Thursday, Jan. 31, at 6 p.m.
Maxwell Auditorium

Mini-Seminar: Suzanne Oboler and Gerald Torres
Friday, Feb. 1, at 10 a.m.
Maxwell Hall (204)
RSVP with safetta@syr.edu

Performance: “Border Beasts"
Carmelita Tropicana, Cuban-American performance artist
Friday, Feb. 1, at 7:30 p.m.
La Casita Cultural Center

Screening: “City of Men” (2007)
Tuesday, Feb. 28, at 6 p.m.
Eggers Hall (220)

Screening: “Los Rubios” (2003)
Thursday, March 21, at 6 p.m.
Eggers Hall (220)


Movement

Keynote Lecture I: “Afro-Atlantic Aesthetics, Migrations, and Musical World-Visions”
Ángel Quintero Rivera, professor of sociology and anthropology at the University of Puerto Rico
Keynote Lecture II: “Indicios, or, the Politics of Place”
Milagros de la Torre, conceptual photographer
Thursday, April 4, at 6 p.m.
Maxwell Auditorium

Mini-Seminar: Ángel Quintero Rivera and Milagros de la Torre
Friday, April 5, at 10 a.m.
The SU Humanities Center, Tolley Building (304)
RSVP at aorr@syr.edu

Brazilian Dance Workshop: The Dance Migration (Toronto)
Friday, April 5, at 2:30 p.m.
Venue TBA

Brazilian Dance Performance: The Dance Migration with Samba Laranja (the SU Brazilian Ensemble)
Friday, April 5, at 7:30 p.m.
Venue TBA

Screening: “Mirror Dance” (2005)
Thursday, March 28, at 6 p.m.
Eggers Hall (220)

Additional support for “Moving Borders” comes from the Office of the Chancellor; the Department of Art and Music Histories, the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, the Latino/Latin American Studies Program, and The SU Humanities Center, all in The College of Arts and Sciences; the departments of history, sociology, and geography in the Maxwell School; PLACA; the Centro de Estudios Hispánicos and the Lino Novas Calvo Fund; Arts Engage, the Office of SU’s Performing Arts Presenter; the Slutzker Center for International Services; La Casita Cultural Center; the Fulbright Association, CNY Chapter; and the Phi Beta Delta International Honor Society.

Click here for more information.



Positions of Dissent banner image

POSITIONS OF DISSENT

Positions of Dissent” is grounded in the unique holdings of the SCRC. The premise of the symposium, explains Sean Quimby, is to reflect on the polysemy of dissent and how it has manifested itself throughout American history.

“It is our contention that the idea of dissent must be understood within specific historical contexts,” he says. “By recognizing the manifold meanings of dissent throughout American history, we can incite a cross-disciplinary dialogue that is urgently needed in this moment of world-wide political and economic turmoil.”

“Positions of Dissent” includes a yearlong series of public lectures and mini-seminars with visiting scholars, as well as “Strange Victories: Grove Press, 1951–1985,” the first major exhibition devoted to avant-garde American publisher Grove Press, notorious for bringing Henry Miller, William Burroughs, and Franz Fanon and other authors to American readers. Programming includes a panel discussion with former Grove Press employees at the SCRC, a screening of films from the Grove Press Film Division, and a reading from Grove Press publications. 

“We believe that linking current scholarship in the humanities to tangible archival sources is of vital importance for understanding fluid and contested concepts like dissent,” continues Quimby. “It’s important to make these resources and knowledge accessible to our students, our local community of scholars, and our regional institutional partners.”

The “Positions of Dissent” schedule is as follows:

Visiting Scholar Lecture Series and Programming

Keynote Lecture: “The Battle Over Sexual Knowledge in 19th-Century America”
Helen Horowitz, the Sydenham Clark Parsons Professor of History Emerita at Smith College
Thursday, Sept. 20, at 6 p.m.
Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, Bird Library (first floor)

Mini-Seminar: Helen Horowitz
Friday, Sept. 21, at 10 a.m.
Lemke Seminar Room, SCRC, Bird Library (sixth floor)
RSVP with Barbara Brooker at bbbrooke@syr.edu or 315-443-9763

Keynote Lecture: “Voluntary Primitivism”
Felicity Scott, associate professor of architecture and director of the Program in Critical, Curatorial, and Conceptual Practices at Columbia University
Thursday, Oct. 11, at 6 p.m.
Peter Graham Scholarly Commons

Mini-Seminar: Felicity Scott
Friday, Oct. 12, at 10 a.m.
Lemke Seminar Room
RSVP at bbbrooke@syr.edu or 315-443-9763

Public Forum I: “Documenting Dissent”
Students in associate professor Joan Bryant’s fall seminar will present research projects that pertain to issues of dissent and draw upon SCRC resources. 
Wednesday, Nov. 14, at 3:45 p.m.
Spector Room, Bird Library (sixth floor)

Keynote Lecture: “Olson’s Archives: From Cosmology to Discourse in New American Poetry” (in conjunction with the 2012 Syracuse Symposium)
Lytle Shaw, associate professor of English at New York University
Thursday, Nov. 15, at 6 p.m.
Peter Graham Scholarly Commons

Mini-Seminar: Lytle Shaw
Friday, Nov. 16, at 10 a.m.
Lemke Seminar Room
RSVP at bbbrooke@syr.edu or 315-443-9763

Public Forum II: “Documenting Dissent”
Students in associate professor Joan Bryant’s fall seminar will present research projects that pertain to issues of dissent and draw upon SCRC resources. 
Wednesday, Nov. 28, at 3:45 p.m.
Spector Room

Keynote Lecture: “Counter-Culture Colophon: Grove Press, the Evergreen Review, and the Incorporation of the Avant-Garde”
Loren Glass, associate professor of English at the University of Iowa
Wednesday, Jan. 16, at 6 p.m.
Peter Graham Scholarly Commons

Keynote Lecture: “Hammer and Sickle, Stars and Stripes: The Odyssey of Earl Browder”
Laura Browder, the Tyler and Alice Haynes Professor of American Studies at the University of Richmond
Thursday, March 7, at 6 p.m.
Peter Graham Scholarly Commons

Mini-Seminar: Laura Browder
Friday, March 8, at 10 a.m.
Lemke Seminar Room
RSVP at bbbrooke@syr.edu or 315-443-9763

Keynote Lecture: “The Public Life of Color, ca. 1971”
Darby English, associate professor of art history at The University of Chicago
Thursday, April 11, at 6 p.m.
Peter Graham Scholarly Commons

Mini-Seminar: Darby English
Friday, April 12, at 10 a.m.
Lemke Seminar Room
RSVP at bbbrooke@syr.edu or 315-443-9763


Strange Victories: Grove Press, 1951-1985: Exhibition and Programming

Panel Discussion with former Grove Press employees, moderated by Loren Glass
Thursday, Jan. 17, at 5 p.m.
Peter Graham Scholarly Commons

Exhibition Opening and Reception
Thursday, Jan. 17, at 6 p.m.
SCRC

Screening: “Dissent on Film,” featuring selections from the Grove Press Film Division
Thursday, Feb. 21, at 7 p.m.
Palace Theater (2384 James St., Syracuse)

Reading: “Reading Grove"
Students, faculty, and community members read from books published by Grove Press
Thursday, April 18, at 6 p.m.
XL Projects (307-313 South Clinton Street, Syracuse)


“Grove Press forever altered the American literary landscape and its relationship to social mores, equality, and freedom of expression,” concludes Quimby, citing Grove’s involvement with such controversial titles as Lady Chatterley’s Lover and Tropic of Cancer. “Until now, the Grove Press archive has remained largely hidden from scholarly view. This exhibition reveals the tremendous wealth of this newly available collection.”

For more information about “Positions of Dissent,” contact Lucy Mulroney, curator of the SCRC at 315-443-8538, or visit dissent.syr.edu.

“Positions of Dissent” is co-sponsored by The SU Humanities Center, the School of Architecture, and departments of History and English.

The Ray Smith Symposium Series was established in 1989 as the result of a bequest from the estate of SU alumnus Ray W. Smith '21 to support symposia on topics in the humanities in SU's College of Arts and Sciences. The symposium is named for the Auburn, N.Y. native who, after graduating from SU in 1921, was a highly respected teacher and administrator.

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Contact Information

Rob Enslin
rmenslin@syr.edu
315-443-3403